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Jul 25, 2022

Writing

How to ask for a raise via email with samples and templates

Wondering how to ask for a raise via email? Our guide to how to ask for a raise emails will help you land the pay raise you deserve with the help of samples and templates. Get ready for a raise!

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Saku Kähkönen

Marketing

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Table of contents

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When it comes to getting a raise, you want to do everything in your power to increase your chances of success. This includes creating a well-crafted email that makes a strong case for why you deserve a pay increase.

In this article, we'll provide tips on how to write an email asking for a raise, as well as some examples that will help get you started.

How and when should you ask for a raise?

Asking for a raise is all about timing. Choosing the right time to have this conversation with your boss is crucial. You don't want to ask for a raise when your company is going through a tough time financially or when you just started the job and haven't had a chance to prove yourself yet.

The best time to ask for a raise is when you can demonstrate that you've made valuable contributions to the company and point to specific examples of how you've helped improve the bottom line.

If you're unsure whether it's the right time to ask for a raise, consider scheduling a meeting with your boss to discuss your career goals and how you can help contribute to the company's success. This will allow you to gauge their reaction and better understand whether they're open to the idea of giving you a raise.

It can be daunting to ask your boss for a raise. Still, following these tips and using the sample email templates below, you can confidently request a meeting with your manager to discuss your compensation.

Don't worry about getting stuck on the writing, as we'll cover the basics and provide you with plenty of examples of how to pitch yourself in this article.

How to request a raise

When asking for a raise, be direct and honest about what you're looking for. State your case clearly and provide specific examples of accomplishments to support your request. If you're unsure what salary range to ask for, do some research online or talk to friends in similar roles to get an idea of what you should earn.

It's also important to be aware of your company's policy on raises. Some companies only give out raises during performance reviews. In contrast, others may be more open to giving raises as needed. If you're unsure of your company's policy, it's always best to check with HR before making your request.Be proactive in your approach; instead of just asking for a raise, ask what you can to earn one. This shows that you're not just looking for more money but also willing to put in the extra work to earn it.

Finally, be prepared to negotiate. Your boss may not be able to give you the same raise you're asking for. Still, they may be open to other forms of compensation, such as additional vacation days or a flexible work schedule. By being willing to compromise, you're more likely to end up with an outcome that satisfies your aspirations.

When should you ask for a raise?

You'll want to be concise and direct when it comes to the actual request. Clearly state why you feel you deserve a raise and back up your claim with examples of your recent accomplishments.

If possible, try to put a dollar amount on what you're hoping to earn. For instance, you might say, "I would like to receive a raise of $2000 per year."

Don't wait for your yearly review to ask for a raise. If you feel like you deserve one, asking sooner is no harm. It may even be to your advantage. Just try not to ask during traditionally busy periods or just before the holidays.

If you just started at your job or recently received a promotion, it's probably too soon to ask for more money. The same goes if you have yet to meet or exceed the expectations of your role.

However, it is perfectly reasonable to set a timetable with your boss, complete with goals to hit, for when you will next discuss salary.

Should I ask for a raise via email?

Asking for a raise via email is a perfectly acceptable way to start the conversation with your boss - as long as you do it the right way.

The idea that all requests for a raise should be made in person is outdated. In today's workplace, people are frequently communicating via email, so it only makes sense to use this method to ask for a raise

If you're working remotely or in a different city than your boss, asking for a raise over email might be your only option.

Rather than just asking for the money upfront, ask for an opportunity to discuss your salary, so you can present your case and negotiate in person.

Asking for a raise is similar to email pitching, so our guide on the basics of pitching could help you out.

How to write an email asking for a raise

When it comes to writing an email asking for a raise, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Tailoring your email to your specific situation and relationship with your boss is key. To make it easier for you, we've put together some tips for writing your raise request email.

Tips on how to ask for a raise in an email

When you're ready to ask for a raise via email, there are a few things you should keep in mind.

Keep it short and to the point

No one wants to read a long, drawn-out email asking for more money. Get straight to the point by explaining why you deserve a raise and how much you would like to earn.

Use specific examples and data

General statements like "I work hard" or "I'm worth more" won't cut it. You need to back up your request with specific examples of your accomplishments and how they've benefited the company. If you have any data to support your case, include that.

Politely state your request

Be polite and humble in your email asking for a raise. Remember, you're essentially asking your boss for more money, so it's crucial to maintain a respectful tone throughout the email. Don't get discouraged if you don't receive the response you were hoping for. Remember, it never hurts to ask. The worst your boss can say is no. And even if they say no, you can use that as an opportunity to discuss what you need to do to earn a raise in the future.

Do's and don'ts of asking for a raise via email

Keep the following in mind when drafting an email asking for a raise.

Do

  • Research your worth. Know the average salary for your position and ensure you're in line with that before asking for a raise. This will help you know how much to ask for and give you the confidence to back up your request.
  • Keep it short and sweet. No one wants to read a novel. Get to the point and be clear about what you're asking for.
  • Be professional. This is not the time to get emotional or guilt your boss into giving you more money. Stick to the facts and logically present your case.
  • Follow up with a meeting. Once you've sent your email, follow up with a meeting to discuss the raise further. This will allow you to elaborate on your points and answer any questions they may have.
  • Be prepared to negotiate. If your boss can't give you the exact amount you asked for, be ready to deal until you reach an agreement that works for both of you. Remember that compromise is vital in any negotiation.

Don't

  • Send an email when you're angry. If you're feeling emotions like anger, frustration, or disappointment, it's best to wait until you've cooled down before hitting send. You don't want those emotions to cloud your message or come across as disrespectful.
  • Make threats. This will only worsen things and could damage your relationship with your boss.
  • Forget to say thank you. Regardless of the conversation's outcome, constantly express your appreciation for their time.

If you want to improve your email writing skills, check out our guide on how to write better emails.

Subject lines for a raise email

When it comes to the subject line of your email, be direct. Something like "Request for a meeting to discuss salary" lets your boss know exactly what you're emailing about and sets the tone for the conversation.If you're worried about how your boss will react to your request, you can try a more neutral subject line like "Can we schedule a meeting?" or "I have a question for you."

Here are some other examples of subject lines you can use.

  • Request for a meeting to discuss salary
  • Can we schedule an appointment?
  • I have a question for you
  • I would like to discuss my salary
  • Do you have time for a chat about my compensation?
  • Can we talk about my pay?

What to include in the raise request email body

When asking for a raise, you'll want to include three critical pieces of information in the body of your email:

  • Your accomplishments: Outline your successes and how you've contributed to the company. Use specific examples and data points to back up your case.
  • The market value: Do some research to determine what other people in your role are making. This will help you build a case for why you deserve a raise.
  • Your ask: Be specific about how much more you would like to be paid per year or per hour.

How to end the pay raise email

Ending your email on a positive and proactive note is vital. Always include a call to action, such as asking for a meeting to discuss your request further. Thank your boss for their time and let them know that you're looking forward to hearing from them soon.

Here are a few examples of how you might end your email.

  • I would appreciate a meeting to discuss this further. Thank you for your time and consideration.
  • I look forward to hearing from you soon. Thank you for taking the time to discuss this with me
  • Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you about my request.


Sample emails asking for a raise

Drafting an email asking for a raise requires the same thought and effort as if you were to sit down with your boss and have a conversation about it. You must make sure you state your case clearly and provide specific examples of why you deserve a raise. If you're unsure where to start on how to word an email asking for a raise, we've created a few raise request email samples that you can use as the starting point for your raise request.

Here is an example of an email requesting a meeting to discuss a raise.

Dear (Manager's name),

I would like to request a meeting with you to discuss my compensation. I am confident that I have been performing at or above expectations in my role and believe that I deserve a raise.

Can we schedule some time to chat? Thank you for your time.

Best,

(Your name)

Here's another sample for a bit more casual yet confident approach.

Dear (Manager's name),

I hope all is going well. I wanted to reach out and request a meeting to discuss my compensation. I have taken on additional responsibilities and projects in the past year and believe I deserve a raise.

Can we schedule some time to chat?

Thanks.

Best,

(Your name)

If you'd prefer to include your entire salary raise request as part of the email, you can do so with a longer message. Here's a sample email asking for a raise.

Dear (Manager's name),

I wanted to reach out and request a meeting to discuss my compensation. I have taken on additional responsibilities and projects in the past year and believe I deserve a raise.

Based on my experience and skills, I also think I'm ready for a promotion.

I've compiled a list of my recent accomplishments and projects to support my request. As you can see, I have been working hard and contributing to the company's success.

I would appreciate a meeting to discuss my compensation and promotion. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

(Your name)

If you want to get more specific about your asking, include a proposed salary or title change in the email. Here's an example.

Dear (Manager's name),

I wanted to reach out and request a meeting to discuss my compensation.

Based on my experience and skills, as well as my recent accomplishments and projects, I believe I deserve a raise to $XX,XXX.

The reason I'm emailing is to request a meeting so that we can further discuss my compensation. I would like the opportunity to explain my reasoning in person and answer any questions you may have.

I would appreciate a meeting to discuss my compensation and promotion.

Thank you for your time,

(Your name)

Asking for a raise email template

Having a template as a guide can help you put together your own email asking for a raise. Here's a simple template you can use as a starting point.

Dear (Manager's name),

I would like to request a meeting with you to discuss my compensation.

I have been with the company for [X] years and believe that, based on my experience and skills, as well as my recent accomplishments and projects, I deserve a raise to $XX,XXX.

I would appreciate 30 minutes of your time to talk about this further.

Thank you,

(Your name)

How to ask for raise using Flowrite

Flowrite is an AI writing assistant that turns your instructions into ready-to-send emails and messages. Our Chrome extension covers the email format, capitalization, grammar, spelling, punctuation. In other words, you can focus on the message, and Flowrite will take care of the delivery. We dare to claim that it's the easiest way to ask for a raise through email. Our email template collection features dozens of templates to help you. To grasp how easy and fast it is to ask for a raise with Flowrite, check out the raise request email exmaple below.

Getting the raise you deserve

Asking for more money is rarely a comfortable conversation. But if you've been with a company for a while and feel like you're being paid below your worth, it's time to have that discussion with your boss.

The most important thing to remember when asking for a raise is to be confident. You need to believe that you deserve the raise and be able to explain why. This isn't the time to be modest or self-deprecating. Remember your accomplishments and successes over the past year (or years), and be prepared to list them in detail.

If you get the raise you want, always remember to say thank you. This will show your boss that you're appreciative and help to solidify the positive relationship between the two of you. Here's our guide to saying thank you over email and 100 examples to ensure you find the best fit for your needs.

Now that you know how to ask for a raise email get out there and put your new skills into action!

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